Why selection bias is the most powerful force in education

Post on Selection Bias and test outcomes.

Post Link: Why selection bias is the most powerful force in education

In other words, what we might have perceived as a difference in education quality was really the product of systematic differences in how the considered populations were put together. The groups we considered had a hidden non-random distribution. This is selection bias.

The Challenge of Creating Schools That ‘Work for Everybody’

School tries the concept of allowing students to Self-Nominate into AP classes, also AP class meets with standard track, and students can also leave AP class easily.

Article Link: The Challenge of Creating Schools That ‘Work for Everybody’

One thing it means is a big push to open the doors of AP classrooms to everyone, not just the white, affluent students who disproportionately fill those chairs. That work is complex, slow-moving, and far from finished.

At tables in the sunny lunchtime commons, brown, black, and white students offer many stories of counselors and teachers who encourage them to try higher-level classes. But that sense of freedom and support isn’t universal.

“They don’t treat people the same,” said an African-American girl who declined to give her name, even though she takes AP classes.

“They kind of size you up, like if they think you’re going to a four-year college, they’re like, ‘AP’s hard, but keep trying.’ If they think you’re maybe just going to community college, it’s more like, ‘Sure, if AP’s too hard, don’t do it.’ “

Achievement Gaps: How Black and White Students in Public Schools

IES Statistical Analysis of NAEP reading assessment, circa 2009

Article Link: Achievement Gaps: How Black and White Students in Public Schools

Achievement Gaps: How Black and White Students in Public Schools Perform in Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress July 2009

White students…had higher scores than Black students, on average, on all assessments. While the nationwide gaps in 2007 were narrower than in previous assessments at both grades 4 and 8 in mathematics and at grade 4 in reading, white students had average scores at least 26 points higher than Black students in each subject, on a 0-500 scale.

This report will use results from both the main NAEP and the long-term trend NAEP assessments to examine the Black-white achievement gaps, and changes in those gaps, at the national and state level.

Fact Sheet: Outcomes for Young, Black Men | Tavis Smiley Reports | PBS

Random PBS reported statistics on the Achievement Gap.  Though we did not verify, they do list their sources.

Article: Fact Sheet: Outcomes for Young, Black Men | Tavis Smiley Reports | PBS

– On average, African American twelfth-grade students read at the same level as white
eighth-grade students.

– The twelfth-grade reading scores of African American males were significantly lower than
those for men and women across every other racial and ethnic group.

– Only 14% of African American eighth graders score at or above the proficient level. These results reveal that millions of young people cannot understand or evaluate text, provide relevant details, or support inferences about the written documents they read.

The Benefits of Blended Learning

Blended Learning has shown potential in bringing specialized learning, e.g. AP and Gifted and Talented classes to underfunded minority-major schools and districts.

Article Link: The Benefits of Blended Learning

If you’ve been hearing about blended learning in your school district, you are not alone. Blended learning is an approach to teaching in which students do part of their coursework in class and part of it online. An increasing number of school districts are using blended learning to make learning more accessible for all students.

There are as many ways to teach blended-learning classes as there are teachers. One of the more popular models involves credit recovery, a process through which students make up credits for classes they failed by completing the work they didn’t finish before. In this model, students are given modules of work to do at their own pace. Another popular model is to teach a traditional class but have students in class only a few days per week. In this model, students complete coursework outside of class and come to the classroom for teacher-planned activities that need to be done there.

 

Google Hopes To Hire More Black Engineers By Bringing Students To Silicon Valley

Minority inclusion by HBCU recruiting and training.

Article Link: Google Hopes To Hire More Black Engineers By Bringing Students To Silicon Valley

In one small step to grow those numbers, this summer 25 students from Howard University, the historically black university based in Washington, D.C., will train at the tech giant’s headquarters in Mountain View, Caif.

With Howard West, as it’s being called, Google believes it can meet that goal faster, says Bonita Stewart, the company’s vice president of global partnerships.

“We have the opportunity to be able to build a qualified pipeline of talent across the black community,” she says.

Entire senior class at D.C.’s Ballou High School applies to college

Higher expectations from admin encourages entire senior class to apply for college.

Article Link: Entire senior class at D.C.’s Ballou High School applies to college

Ballou ranks among the city’s lowest-performing high schools on core measures.

Its graduation rate last school year, 57 percent, was second-lowest among regular schools in the D.C. Public Schools system, behind Anacostia High’s rate of 42 percent. (That comparison doesn’t include alternative schools.) Last school year, 3 percent of Ballou students tested met reading standards on citywide standardized exams. Almost none met math standards.

Despite these challenges, administrators said it was the Class of 2017 that decided all seniors would apply to college. The students themselves set the ambitious goal last spring. Administrators say they never doubted the students would meet it.