City launches $1.6M plan to improve school AP class diversity

City announces AP for All, which should help the over 50% of minority students who do not have access to a single AP class at their schools.

Article Link: City launches $1.6M plan to improve school AP class diversity

City Education Department officials have launched a $1.6 million plan to bring more black and Hispanic students into Advanced Placement courses, the Daily News has learned.

The city’s new Lead Higher program aims to bring 1,400 of these students at two dozen public schools into AP classes that are often dominated by white and Asian students.

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Just 7,386 black and Hispanic students passed AP exams in the 2014-15 school year, compared to 14,323 white and Asian students. Black and Hispanic kids account for roughly 70% of all city school students.

Melanie Katz, principal of Franklin D. Roosevelt High School in Brooklyn, said she hopes the Lead Higher program will help her add another 60 black and Hispanic students to AP classes in 2017.

Record Number of NYC Students Taking College-Level AP Classes, Mayor Says

In hopes of increasing the number of students experiencing college rigor courses prior to high-school graduation access to AP is increasing.

Article Link: Record Number of NYC Students Taking College-Level AP Classes, Mayor Says

A record 44,906 students took at least one Advanced Placement, or AP class, during the 2015-16 school year, up 8.4 percent from the year before. But only 24,006 of those students passed at least one of the tests, an increase of about 8.2 percent from the number who passed the year before, officials said.

More students of color enrolled in AP classes last year as well: the number of black students taking at least one class was up by 14.1 percent and the number of Hispanic students up by 9.9 percent compared to 2015.

The Department of Education launched a campaign last year called AP for All, which aims to equip every high school to offer at least five of the more rigorous courses, for which students can earn college credits, by the fall of 2021.

A Comparison of the College Outcomes of AP and Dual Enrollment Students

AP is often the only chance a student may get to experience college rigor.  But last year in NYC over 50% of Black students attended a school that did not offer a single AP class.

Report PDF Link : A Comparison of the College Outcomes of AP and Dual Enrollment Students

Research has indicated that a rigorous high school
curriculum is a strong predictor of college success and
is:
– positively related to standardized test scores
– positively related to college enrollment rates
– positively related to four-year graduation rates
– negatively related to remediation rates

One way of delivering rigor is through providing college level courses to high school students. Two examples are:
– Dual enrollment
– Advanced Placement